The relationship between institutional, course-level and individual teaching excellence in higher education: A proposal for developing competitive advantage through leveraging the expertise of excellent university teachers

Authors

  • Sally Brown Leeds Metropolitan University
  • Ruth Pickford Leeds Metropolitan University

Abstract


Internationally many nations are seeking to recognise and reward excellent teaching at an institutional, subject and individual level, acknowledging the importance of outstanding teaching as a contribution to positive student learning experiences through students’ academic, emotional and transactional engagement. This paper explores the ways in which higher education teaching excellence can be recognised and rewarded, using a case study from the UK, and considers the relationship between institutional, course-level and individual teaching excellence. We conclude by proposing that HEIs can develop a competitive advantage through leveraging the expertise of excellent university teachers to the benefit of learners. 

Author Biographies

Sally Brown, Leeds Metropolitan University

Emerita Professor, Leeds Metropolitan University Adjunct Professor, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland Adjunct Professor, James Cook University, Northern Queensland Adjunct Professor, Central Queensland University Visiting Professor, University of Plymouth Visiting Professor Liverpool John Moores University

Ruth Pickford, Leeds Metropolitan University

Ruth Pickford is Professor of Assessment, Learning and Teaching and Deputy Director of Assessment, Learning and Teaching (ALT) at Leeds Metropolitan University. A former systems analyst in the steel industry, Ruth joined Leeds Metropolitan University as an associate senior lecturer on January 1st 2000. In 2002 she was awarded the Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching and in 2003 became a University Teacher Fellow.  In 2004 she was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship (NTF) and in 2005, the Award for Innovative Excellence in Teaching, Learning and Technology.

In the same year she co-authored, with Sally Brown, Assessing Skills and Practice (Routledge) and in 2007 co-authored with Phil Race, Making Teaching Work (SAGE).  Ruth has worked on a number of HEFCE funded research projects including CETL (Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning) and NTF projects.  She has directed numerous assessment, learning and teaching related conferences and is a popular international keynote speaker and consultant. 

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Published

2015-10-31

Issue

Section

Invited Reflections